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Home & Lifestyle

Drywall Patching Fixes Holes, Dents in Walls

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Suburban Life Magazine

It’s not unusual to find holes or dents in the walls of your home. If your door stopper fails, the back side of the knob can hit the wall behind it and create a dent. If you relocate artwork or shelving, there will be holes left behind. Nail pops and soggy water damage on a ceiling or exterior wall will also require drywall patching.

Patching drywall is a fairly simple DIY project. You’ll need drywall compound, a small bucket for larger jobs, a putty knife, and sanding paper. For larger holes you’ll need mesh patches. All are available at your nearby home improvement store.

Start with self-priming patch filling compound. Traditional materials require a separate priming step before painting so the patched areas don’t show up as foggy spots. Self-priming compound lets you avoid this additional step.

Fill the hole or dent in the wall with the patching compound, and smooth it out over a larger area with the putty knife. Let it dry for the prescribed amount of time and sand it down. Add more coats if necessary, allowing them to dry and sanding them down as needed. For mudrooms or toy rooms that may have a large number of dents in the walls, skim coat the entire damaged area with the compound two or three times. The thinner layers will dry quickly and be easy to sand.

Medium sized holes are easily fixed with stick-on mesh patches. The patch covers the hole, then the compound is layered on and sanded off to create a level surface. Larger, deeper holes require the use of joint compound that sets up with a chemical reaction, creating a stronger surface. The final step is to paint the area.

While drywall patching is not a difficult DIY project, many homeowners prefer to leave it to the experts. For professional advice or assistance with drywall patching, please contact:

Mr. Handyman of Wheaton-Hinsdale

245 W. Roosevelt Road #69

West Chicago, IL

Phone: 630-318-6882

www.mrhandyman.com