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Local News

Ficarello 'strongly opposes' Illinois graduated income tax change

Voters to weigh in on constitutional change in election

Nick Ficarello, a Republican candidate for Will County executive, speaks to the Herald-News on Thursday, Dec. 5, 2019, in Joliet, Ill.
Nick Ficarello, a Republican candidate for Will County executive, speaks to the Herald-News on Thursday, Dec. 5, 2019, in Joliet, Ill.

Get federal, state and suburban county executive races here.

The Republican candidate for Will County executive said he “strongly opposes” a possible change to the Illinois constitution to allow for a graduated state income tax.

Nick Ficarello, the former chief of police in Braidwood, came out against the proposed change as voters will ultimately decide on the constitutional change. The state’s constitution requires a flat income tax, which Democrats voted to do away with to implement graduated tax brackets they said would only raise taxes on 3% of residents.

Ficarello used the issue to attack his Democratic opponent in the race, state Sen. Jennifer Bertino-Tarrant, D-Shorewood. He argued eliminating the flat tax requirement, which he called a “safeguard,” will give the Democrats in the state legislature a “blank checkbook.”

“This will put another stranglehold on Illinois business and development,” he said in the release.

He added that Bertino-Tarrant supported the change and said, “We all must wonder if she cares about the further destruction of the Illinois middle class.”

When the legislature passed the bill to allow for the constitutional change last year, Bertino-Tarrant said she was in favor of allowing for a graduated income tax, but thought it was “too premature” to set the specific rates at that time.

Supporters argue the proposed tax brackets would reduce or maintain income taxes for 97% of residents while generating about $3.6 billion in additional revenue.

The election is Nov. 3, but early voting has already begun in Illinois.

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