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Home & Lifestyle

Tips For Mailbox Installation and Maintenance

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Suburban Life Magazine

If you’re tired of your old mailbox, or if you’re moving into a newly built home, there are things to know about installing a new (or changing out an old) mailbox.  If you decide to build your own, it has to meet the same standards as manufactured boxes; your local postmaster can approve your plans and give you the go-ahead to create your special mailbox.

Some homeowners choose to create a mailbox that resembles their home, and some decorate the box to promote their favorite sports team.  Mailboxes can be painted with images of flowers, pets, or other colorful designs.  The type of mailbox you install could be restricted by your Homeowner’s Association, so be sure to get approval before making any changes or creating any new designs. 

Your mailbox’s opening should be positioned about 6-8” back from the curb.  Boxes should include your house number, and if it’s located on a different street from your home, should also include your full street address.  Your mail carrier should be able to reach the mailbox easily and safely, and should be able to verify the correct address.

The mailbox’s post or other support should be stable, but should bend away if hit by a car. 

A 4” x 4” wooden support or a 2”-diameter steel or aluminum pipe is recommended by the Federal Highway Administration.  Posts should be buried no more than 2’ deep.  Concrete posts are not recommended by the FHA.

Mailboxes should be checked annually for damage.  Look for loose hinges on the door, and replace or tighten rusty or loose parts.  Replace missing or faded house numbers, and keep the path to the mailbox clear.

Mr. Handyman of Wheaton-Hinsdale can provide expert assistance in building, installing, or fixing your mailbox.  For more information, please contact:

Mr. Handyman of Wheaton-Hinsdale

245 W. Roosevelt Road #69

West Chicago, IL

Phone:  630-318-6882

www.mrhandyman.com