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Government

Amendment to Annie LeGere Law sent to Rauner

An amendment to the Annie LeGere Law has been sent to Gov. Bruce Rauner's office and awaits his signature for enactment, having passed the Illinois House of Representatives on May 22.
An amendment to the Annie LeGere Law has been sent to Gov. Bruce Rauner's office and awaits his signature for enactment, having passed the Illinois House of Representatives on May 22.

ELMHURST – An amendment to the Annie LeGere Law has been sent to Gov. Bruce Rauner's office and awaits his signature for enactment, having passed the Illinois House of Representatives on May 22.

Senate Bill 2226, sponsored by state Sen. Chris Nybo, R-Elmhurst, would offer greater liability protection for medical professionals prescribing EpiPens to law enforcement entities, such as the Elmhurst Police Department.

“The Annie LeGere Law is a true community-led effort, and one that has drawn a great deal of interest from law enforcement and health professionals as a vital new public safety measure,” Nybo said in a news release. “Elmhurst Police Department has already budgeted for EpiPens and extensive device training – but health providers need more reassurance before issuing the prescriptions and signing off on the training programs. Senate Bill 2226, pending the Governor’s signature, I believe will offer them the coverage they need to join the initiative and help us continue implementation.” 

The amendment specifies that a physician, physician's assistant or advanced practice registered nurse with prescriptive authority who provides a prescription or standing order for epinephrine for an Illinois police department will not be subject to civil or professional liability for law enforcement’s misuse of the medication, according to the release.

The Annie LeGere Law enables police officers to be trained and equipped with epinephrine injectors, a drug that reverses the effects of anaphylactic shock caused by an allergic reaction. EpiPen is a common brand of epinephrine injector.

The law became effective in January 2017, and it is named for Elmhurst resident Annie LeGere, who died Aug. 26, 2015, from prolonged anaphylactic shock caused by an allergic reaction. She was 13 years old.

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