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Local News

Jacobs High School's mumps count rises to 6

Graduates wait to cross the stage during the Jacobs High School commencement ceremony
Graduates wait to cross the stage during the Jacobs High School commencement ceremony

ALGONQUIN – Three additional Jacobs High School students tested positive for mumps, a spokesperson for Community Unit School District 300 confirmed in an email Thursday.

Before Thursday's announcement, three other students from the Algonquin school had contracted the disease. In the email, Anthony McGinn, director of public relations and communication services at Community Unit School District 300, said the three additional students bring the school's total to six.

McGinn said all three students attended Jacobs High School through the last day of school on May 25. All six of the students who have tested positive for mumps were vaccinated against the disease, and the three new additions do not share any common activities within the school setting.

Students who did not get the measles, mumps and rubella, or MMR, vaccine or are immunocompromised have not attended Jacobs High School since May 15, when the first student tested positive for mumps.

McGinn said the district "will continue to address this issue proactively" by monitoring the situation alongside the Kane and McHenry County health departments and taking extra precautions, including heightened cleaning policies.

Mumps is an infectious viral disease that can cause swelling and tenderness of the salivary glands in the cheeks and jaw. It can be spread through coughing, sneezing and by direct contact with saliva and discharges from the nose and throat of infected people. In the U.S., outbreaks have most often been reported on college campuses in recent years, according to the Illinois Department of Public Health.

For information on the mumps, visit the Kane County Health Department's website at kanehealth.com/mumps.htm.

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