Cicero President Larry Dominick makes 2013 worst bosses list by eBossWatch

CICERO – Cicero Town President Larry Dominick was recently listed as one of the worst bosses in America in 2013 by website eBossWatch. The list also includes five restaurant managers, eight law enforcement officers and officials, two fire department bosses and a church bishop.

But the word from the Dominick camp is he made the list as a result of “exaggerated and politically-biased news published by the fading newspaper the [Chicago] Sun-Times,” Dominick’s spokesman Ray Hanania said.

Dominick was named as a defendant in two sexual harassment lawsuits filed by town workers since 2007 and was most recently accused by a former police officer of making sexual advances toward her and even fondled her. The town of Cicero’s insurance carrier agreed to a $675,000 settlement with the officer.

Dominick said he never made such advances toward the former officer.

In 2011, Cicero paid a $500,000 settlement to the former head of the town animal shelter, who said Dominick groped or touched her inappropriately on several occasions.

Founded in 2007, eBossWatch bills itself as “a leading career resource that enables job seekers and employees to share information about prospective and current employers.”

The website states: “BossWatch enables people to anonymouslyֲ rate their bossesֲ  and employers using a respectable evaluation survey so thatֲ job seekersֲcan search potential workplaces and can access inside information about what it’s really like to work there.”

Hanania said the accusations as reported on the site are inaccurate.

“It’s hard to believe President Dominick would be included for being involved in several lawsuits, many of which he was dismissed as a defendant, because the lawsuits were politically motivated and false,” Hanania said. “Most of the lawsuits were filed for political reasons and President Dominick has
successfully responded to them.

“It sounds like the eBoss List is a politically motivated list with no real credibility. Anyone can pay to have a press release issued and make any false accusations just as a political news sheet like the [Chicago] Sun-Times can publish anything they want, even if it is not true.”

Hanania said eBoss should have called him instead of relying on stories from news websites.

As for the settlements, he added it is often cheaper for the municipality to settle out of court than to be vindicated of guilt.